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The Quick Facts About Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) Positive Cats
  • FIV is a slow virus that affects the immune system over a period of years.
  • FIV is a cat-only disease. It cannot be spread to humans or other non-felines.
  • FIV is spread through serious, penetrating bite wounds. The type of bite wound that is seen most often in feral, intact tomcats. The virus can also be spread through blood transfusions and on occasion a mother may infect her kittens while they’re in the womb or through her milk after they are born.
  • FIV can’t be spread casually between cats, such as in water or food bowls, or in litter boxes. Cuddling, playing and other forms of casual physical contact do not spread the virus.
  • The FIV virus was discovered in 1986. Before then, FIV positive cats and non-FIV cats lived together peacefully all the time.
  • FIV itself does not shorten a cat’s life-span. Because FIV affects a cat’s immune system it is more difficult for an FIV+ cat to fight off disease.  For that reason an FIV+ cat requires a diligent owner—someone who will take her to the vet twice a year for check ups and, immediately, at the first sign of illness. 
  • FIV+ cats are no different from other cats, often living long, healthy lives, never showing any symptoms at all.
The Quick Facts About Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) Positive Cats
  • FeLV is a retrovirus that affects the cat’s health ability to fight off infection. FeLV is a cat-only disease. It cannot be spread to humans or other non-felines. FeLV is not airborne; it is transmitted through close continuous contact among cats.
  • Usually prolonged contact or a serious, penetrating bite is necessary for transmission. The virus can be spread through mutual grooming, nose-to-nose contact, and shared food and water bowls.
  • FeLV can also be found in lesser amounts in tears, urine, and feces thus litter boxes could be a source of infection in multi-cat households. For this reason, it is recommended to not have FeLV+ and FeLV- cats comingle.
  • A mother can infect her kittens while they are in the womb or through nursing the kittens.
  • Because FeLV affects a cat’s immune system, it is more difficult for an FeLV+ cat to fight off disease. For that reason, an FeLV+ cat requires a diligent owner—someone who will take her to the vet twice a year for check ups and, immediately, at the first sign of illness.
  • The Feline Leukemia Virus can remain latent in a cat’s system for years. A low stress environment, a healthy diet, immune boosting vitamins and a life indoors are essential for a FeLV+ cat.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Boots


Georgie


Red Cloud


Ziggy

 


Tigger